HOW TO WRITE AND SELL EROTICA by M. Christian

Description

"Want to write erotica and get published? Then do yourself a favor and buy this book!" —Marilyn Jaye Lewis, author, founder of The Erotic Authors Association

No one knows more about writing and selling erotica, from inspiration to publication, than M. Christian!

The author of over three hundred stories, eight collections of his own shorter work, five novels, and the editor of over two dozen anthologies, he has seen process from every point of view, as writer, editor and publisher. In this unique insider's guide, he makes the path easy for others with lifesaving tips, hard-earned lessons and personal observations ... including how to:

* incorporate the key elements that make an erotic story sell
* think sexy and cultivate your erotic imagination
* create plots and characters that turn readers on
* put the right dash of sex in a sex story
* sell your work to magazines, websites, anthologies, book publishers
* write convincing stories for sexual orientation and interests beyond your own
* find the best internet resources for writers of erotica
* pinpoint the right place to sell your work
* get along with editors and publishers
* respond correctly to fans, reviewers and criticism
- and much, much more!

"...practical insider’s tips ... a fearlessly honest look at the realities of publishing erotica ... will educate, amuse and inspire veterans and new writers alike. A must-read." -Donna George Storey, author of An Amorous Woman

M. Christian is one of the acknowledged masters of erotica whose work is constantly selected for inclusion in the yearly "best of" anthologies including Best American Erotica, Best Gay Erotica, Best Lesbian Erotica, and Best Fetish Erotica. His stories have been collected in Dirty Words, Filthy Boys, Technorotica, The Bachelor Machine and has also edited a distinguished line of anthologies on his own and with collaborators. His novels Running Dry, The Very Bloody Marys, Me2, Brushes, and Painted Doll were published to critical acclaim.

Buy Now!

Click to purchase as an ebook for $7.99:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble
iTunes
Kobo

Click to purchase as a paperback for $17.99:
Amazon
Barnes & Noble

About the Author

Calling M.Christian versatile is a tremendous understatement.

Extensively published in science fiction, fantasy, horror, thrillers, and even non-fiction, it is in erotica that M.Christian has become an acknowledged master - with more than 400 stories in such anthologies as Best American Erotica, Best Gay Erotica, Best Lesbian Erotica, Best Bisexual Erotica, Best Fetish Erotica, and, in fact, too many anthologies, magazines, and sites to name.

M. Christian has also edited a distinguished line of anthologies on his own and with collaborators like Maxim Jakubowski and Sage Vivant.

His novels Running Dry, The Very Bloody Marys, Me2, Brushes, and Painted Doll were published to critical acclaim. He blogs monthly for The Erotica Readers and Writers Association website.

When he's not writing - which isn't often - M.Christian ("Chris" to his friends) is an avid foodie, gamer, photographer, and also creates odd little art projects ... and, considering Chris, 'odd' is an understatement as well.

Review

M. Christian’s How to Write and Sell Erotica is a collection of short essays drawn from his regular blog postings on the Erotica Readers & Writers Association website. As one might expect from their origins in the blogosphere, the style of these pieces is personal, pithily opinionated and, at times charmingly irreverent; informal but always informative. Topics are wide ranging, touching on numerous issues of concern to established and aspiring writers of genre (i.e. non-literary) erotica. I especially like Christian’s definition of erotica as works that “do not blink” when it comes time to describe sexual activity—a healthy counterweight to the sort of prissy detachment on display in [some similar books].

His repeated observation that, in our society, if you cut off somebody’s head “you get an R rating; if you show someone giving head, you get an NC-17” is right on the money in addition to being funny as hell because it’s so maddeningly true. I find moving his suggestion that, perhaps, someday society will achieve such a level of enlightenment, frankness and maturity that erotica will disappear as a separate genre—would that it could be so in our lifetime. Like [Susie] Bright, Christian does his share of cheerleading, offering encouragement and inspiration, though usually with a healthy dose of realism and a plea to maintain a set of realistic expectations. There are so many marvelous quotable passages in these essays I find it hard to choose only one; so updating the ancient practice of sortilegium for the Age of the E-Reader, here’s one at random:

One more thing you could do [by writing erotica] is help people. We don’t like sex in this country. Sure, we sell beer and cars with it, but we don’t like it. We’re scared of it. Living in this world with anything that’s not beer and car commercial sexuality can be a very frightening and lonely experience. Too many people feel that they are alone, or that what they like to do sexually is wrong, sinful or sick. Now, I’m not talking about violent or abusive sexual feelings, but rather an interest in something that harms no one and that other people have discovered to be harmless or even beneficial. If you treat what you’re writing about with respect, care and understanding, you could reach out to someone somewhere and help them understand and maybe even get through their bad feelings about their sexuality—bad feelings, by the way, that maybe have been dished out by the lazy and ignorant for way too long.

As with any book of this type, readers will not always agree with the author on every point—and that’s as it should be. For instance, I don't agree with Christian--or Stephen King for that matter--who argue that a writer should never resort to a thesaurus. (As the compiler of The Erotic Writer's Thesaurus on this site, you can bet I disagree!) Nor does Christian like the idea of constantly “changing up” descriptive words in a text, especially where bodily parts are concerned. Others may be horrified, recalling nightmare critique sessions in creative writing class where they were admonished to avoid repetition and parallelism like the plague. Christian could have a point, although his tone may be a tad too ex-cathedra not to wrinkle a few noses, I remain skeptically neutral on this particular issue, while Christian is happy to inform his readers that he never got much out of those creative writing courses. He also doesn’t particularly like being reviewed—“shut up!” I think were his exact words. All I can say is; tough titties, dude; the book is recommended, so suck on it!

—Terrance Aldon Shaw, Erotica for the Big Brain

Categories Sexperience , Paperbacks
Author Page M. Christian's Sizzler Editions eBooks

Permanent link to this article: https://sizzlereditions.com/how-to-write-and-sell-erotica-by-m-christian/